Monday, December 30, 2019

Andrew Fraknoi: Exploring the Universe: My Humorous Science Fiction Story (about SETI) Rec...

Andrew Fraknoi: Exploring the Universe: My Humorous Science Fiction Story (about SETI) Rec...: A brief short story I wrote -- about the first message we receive from an extra-terrestrial civilization -- has recently been publishe...

My Humorous Science Fiction Story (about SETI) Recently Published


A brief short story I wrote -- about the first message we receive from an extra-terrestrial civilization -- has recently been published by the "SciPhi Journal" (an on-line magazine that specializes in philosophical science fiction.) You can read the story for free at:  
Perhaps the story can provide a touch of humor during these days of so much dark news. All the very best to everyone for a "cosmic" new year: may our planet becomes a better world for all of us. 
More about my ventures into the world of science fiction -- after having dealt with science fact for more than four decades -- can be found at: 

Sunday, July 28, 2019

Andrew Fraknoi: Exploring the Universe: My Second Published Science Fiction Story Now Avai...

Andrew Fraknoi: Exploring the Universe: My Second Published Science Fiction Story Now Avai...:   As some regular readers know, one my recent projects is writing short science fiction stories based on good astronomy. After a...

My Second Published Science Fiction Story Now Available Free On Line

No photo description available.


 As some regular readers know, one my recent projects is writing short science fiction stories based on good astronomy. After a long learning period, two of my stories have now been published in science fiction anthologies. The second one, which is about exploding stars and music, just had its rights returned to me, and so I am happy to put it up free on the web for everyone's enjoyment at: 
After the short story, I have put a non-technical explanation of the science behind the fiction.
The accompanying photo is a NASA composite showing the remnant of Tycho's Supernova, a star seen to explode by the great astronomer Tycho Brahe in October 1604. In this image, blue and green colors shows what the remnant would look like if you had x-ray eyes, the yellow shows what it looks like in visible light, and the green shows the heat rays (infrared) coming from the object. Blended together, all the colors show where this remarkable "left-over"of a star that blew itself to bits is still glowing brightly more than 400 years later.
By the way, if you also want to read my first published science fiction story "A Cave in Arsia Mons" (about a surprising discovery on Mars), you can do so at: 

Thursday, July 18, 2019

Andrew Fraknoi: Exploring the Universe: My Talk to the Commonwealth Club on the Moon

Andrew Fraknoi: Exploring the Universe: My Talk to the Commonwealth Club on the Moon: The Commonwealth Club of California invited me to give an illustrated public talk about the Moon on the occasion of the 50th anniversar...

My Talk to the Commonwealth Club on the Moon


The Commonwealth Club of California invited me to give an illustrated public talk about the Moon on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the first human steps on our neighbor world. The video record is now available free on the Web, so if you are any of your friends (or students) are interested, you can find it at: https://www.commonwealthclub.org/…/astronomer-andrew-frakno…
I wanted to speak not so much about the astronauts and their journey (which so many other media and articles are covering in vast depth) but about the Moon itself, and what we now know about it, 50 years later. Hope you enjoy.
An audio-only version of the talk is also available as a podcast, at: https://www.commonwealthclub.org/events/archive/podcast/astronomer-andrew-fraknoi-50-years-our-first-step
The photo shows the Moon in front of a full Earth as seen from millions of miles away by the Deep Space Climate Discovery Spacecraft in 2015.